Sunday, November 19, 2017

"And so it begins..."

A post shared by Reeves Gabrels (@reevesgabrels) on

Andy Anderson interview this weekend


Show airs today, listen here -
https://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcessex

If you missed it, listen here at the 1:31:45 mark.

Friday, November 17, 2017

'Six Different Ways' in 'It'


For me, the biggest Cure news while the blog was inactive was the inclusion of 'Six Different Ways' in the new film adaptation of Stephen King's 'It'. Being a huge King fan, and 'It' being my favorite King book, and one of my favorite books overall, I was stunned and so happy when that scene appeared! You have no idea how much restraint it took me to not post the above tweet in the middle of the film. :)

They put together some Spotify playlists for the characters in the film, and of course The Losers' Club have some Cure on their lists. Beverly has 'Just Like Heaven', Bill has 'Pictures of You', and Richie has 'Lovesong' & 'In Between Days'.

Director Andy Muschietti spoke with Film.it, and was asked about the scene:

"Let's talk about The Cure and the song you chose: Six Different Ways. It's funny how one can perfectly relate it to the six guys in the movie ...

Oh yes and they talk about their relationship with Beverly. When I noticed this, we shot a scene where Robert Smith's voice replaced that of our actress Sophia Lillis. I liked it a lot, but we had to give it up because, according to some, the audience was confused."

Some mentions of the scene from various articles and reviews:

"But then, of course, there are the kids. After one scene of nightmare gore that owes a lot to Johnny Depp’s kill in the original “Nightmare on Elm Street” — “It” for sure earns its R-rating — the group is forced to scrub down a bathroom and wash it free of blood. It’s a grisly scene but it’s set to the poppy bounce of the Cure’s “Six Different Ways,” a smart cue that lets you know the filmmakers know and respect the time and the era in which they’re working. It makes the film come alive, and like the best parts of “It,” it has nothing to do with that silly clown." - The Detroit News

"And the restraint allows the two big songs used in the film to have a greater impact. The Cure’s ‘Six Different Ways’ plays when the Losers clean up Beverly’s blood-soaked bathroom, a sight only the group can see thanks to Pennywise. The bond between the Losers forms as they scrub retro-tiled floors and agree that Pennywise is the real deal. And nothing binds outcasts like The Cure." - Junkee

"It even includes a montage set to The Cure’s “Six Different Way” (one of the best uses of the song I’ve seen in a film)." - We Are Movie Geeks

"Placing the film in 1989 is an interesting choice. Those expecting a “Stranger Things” experience where the eccentricities of the decade take center stage will be somewhat disappointed that the references aren’t nearly as overt. They are still there, but more in the background. I’m particularly fond of the way The Cure’s “Six Different Ways” is used for a rather bloody montage. The tone of the song is seemingly inappropriate, but it works because there is a lighter undercurrent at play here. These are kids, no matter how vulgar or inappropriate they come across, it is their collective innocence that defines them."- KUTV

"Still, Muschietti avoids realism so that he can easily shift the tone back toward an observant human comedy. Sometimes the juxtaposition is brazen: the Losers team up to clean Beverly’s bloody bathroom while The Cure’s playful “Six Different Ways” provides the soundtrack." - Washington City Paper

"Muschietti shares King’s love of period-appropriate rock music, though he doesn’t always use it appropriately: One potentially blood-curdling scene is bizarrely neutered by its use of the Cure’s “Six Different Ways.” - Variety

"For the sensitive teens of the '80s, few bands could encapsulate the swirling angst of adolescence more completely than the Cure, and the group's ascension to mainstream status really got going with 1985's The Head on the Door. Boosted by the hit single "In Between Days," which reflected the band's evolving style as well as frontman Robert Smith's growing creative control, the record launched a thousand swooning mixtapes — and while music was probably the furthest thing from Bill and Bev's minds during the bloody aftermath of It's visit to her bathroom, the Door track "Six Different Ways" is still a suitably bittersweet soundtrack for their shared moment." - Diffuser

Sorry for this very long post, but I love the film (saw it 6 times, of course, in theatres!), love that The Cure are now a part of the highest grossing horror film of all time, and that the band (and a Cure song not usually used in films) got so much exposure!

Anyway, if you haven't seen 'It', it is still playing in some theatres, and will be released digitally on Dec. 19th, and on DVD/Blu-Ray on Jan. 9th.

The Cure in 1984: "Boys Don't Cry" and Beyond


From Paste:

From the Vault: On Nov. 16, 1984, the band visited Washington, D.C., with a mix of new material and radio favorites.

The Cure had been gradually building their U.S. fan base when they embarked on their third American tour to promote their 1984 album, The Top. On Nov. 16, 1984, the band visited the Ontario Theatre in Washington, D.C., where they played a mix of new material and the favorites that had made them instant icons in England.

Coming off the success of hits like “Let’s Go To Bed” and “Boys Don’t Cry,” Robert Smith and Co. had finally come to the point where they could take The Cure’s eccentric, characteristically dark sound and combine it with a more radio-friendly approach. At the time, Smith was also playing with Siouxsie and the Banshees, but musically, his true home was always with The Cure—a fact made more than apparent on this recording. The band would ultimately go through a number of musical and personal upheavals, and even though The Top wasn’t their most warmly received album, this was a fruitful period for The Cure. This show offers an impeccable live recording of one of the ‘80s biggest groups in their prime.


Listen to the show at Paste.

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Life goes on


The CoF blog is officially back as of today, and it feels so good to be updating here again. Thank you all for your kindness and support. It means the world to me. Here's to better days ahead and a ton of updates in 2018.

Over the next day or two, I will be adding a bunch of the stuff from the Summer/Autumn that didn't get posted here, only on Twitter. And going forward, this site will be back to normal.

Cure 40th Anniversary Calendar

As most of you know, there's a new official Cure Store that went online a few weeks back, selling a bunch of 2016 tour merchandise, and now they have added a 2018 40th Anniversary Cure Calendar.
Thanks, @guillaume_g_z.

'England is Mine' release dates


'England is Mine', from executive producer Roger O'Donnell, is out now digitally, and Dec. 4th on DVD.

Reeves' new live album


Reeves released a new live album, 'Imaginary Friends Live', on October 1st. You can buy a copy at Bandcamp.

"Imaginary Friends Live was recorded during one night's performance at The Family Wash/Garage Coffee in Nashville, Tennessee by the rock trio Reeves Gabrels and His Imaginary Friends. The band features Reeves Gabrels (The Cure, David Bowie) on lead vocals and lead guitar, with Kevin Hornback on bass and Marc Pisapia on drums and harmony vocals."

5 Questions with Reeves Gabrels

You’ve played so many shows and worked with so many incredible people during your career. What have been some of the most memorable moments as a musician?

RG: I have been extremely lucky in that almost every day on the road or in the studio has offered some little gift that sticks in my memory.

Any day writing songs with David Bowie was memorable, funny, educational and entertaining.
Here's one recent and moving moment to stand in for all. After I joined The Cure (in 2012) we did a tour of South America and Mexico the following spring. Our show in Mexico City happened to be on Robert Smith's birthday. Right before we were to take the stage, there was an earthquake. Within minutes of the first roll of the ground, and the sounds of surprise (and fear) from the crowd, and once it was clear that there was no structural risk to the stage or stadium, we decided instantly to play the show. That experience was memorable in terms of the size of the stadium, and how much it meant to the audience that we simply came out and carried on to play the music. We played over 4 hours, as a thank you to them.

Read the rest at Do 617.

Reeves Gabrels On Distinguishing Original Music From His Work With David Bowie


Reeves Gabrels joined The Cure in 2012 and is also known for his partnership with David Bowie from 1987 through 1999. A co-founder of the rock band Tin Machine featuring David Bowie, Tony Sales, and Hunt Sales, Gabrels went on to work closely with Bowie as a guitarist and co-writer for Outside (1995) and as a guitarist, co-writer, and co-producer for Earthling (1997) and Hours (1999). Gabrels also served as Bowie’s guitarist and music director across a dozen years of touring, including Bowie’s tour with Nine Inch Nails and the legendary rock icon’s 50th birthday celebration at Madison Square Garden.

In 2017, Gabrels released his sixth album, Imaginary Friends Live, which sees the guitarist and vocalist supported by a collection of his superb musical colleagues. In addition to his fruitful solo career, Gabrels has previously released two improvisatory guitar-duo albums—one with Bill Nelson of Be-Bop Deluxe fame and the other with David Tronzo who currently teaches at Boston’s Berklee College of Music—and composes film, television, and video-game soundtracks. A sought-after collaborator, he has written, performed, and recorded with musicians in genres from heavy metal to hip-hop to electronica to jazz.

Read the interview at Live for Live Music.

Railhammer Reeves Gabrels Signature Pickups

Sean Hughes Meeting The Cure Is Brilliant


From Radio X (watch the video on their site):

The legendary band appeared with the late comedian on his sitcom back in 1993: “Mum!”

If you’re of a certain age, you were probably gutted to hear of the death of comedian Sean Hughes yesterday (16 October), aged just 51.

Aside from his stand-up career and his long tenure as a team captain on the BBC’s Never Mind The Buzzcocks, Hughes also had a Channel 4 sitcom called, not unreasonably, Sean’s Show.

Running for two series between 1992 and 1993, the programme was a surreal version of a sitcom, as Hughes was aware he was in a TV show, aware of the audience, had conversations with a talking spider called Elvis, listened to The Smiths and housed a group of Bosnian refugees in his spare room, who just watched TV.

The final episode aired on 29 December 1993 and concerned Sean’s discovery that he was adopted. As he searches for his long-lost mother, he spots a familiar face in the pub. Watch the clip for the bizarre revelation.

The love-in between The Cure and Sean Hughes continued as the comedian later appeared with fellow laff-maker Rob Newman (of The Mary Whitehouse Experience fame) in the video for the band’s bizarre single, The 13th.

RIP Sean!

Nick from Slowdive was Simon for Halloween





Chris Carrabba's Journey From Fanning Over The Cure to Being Dashboard Confessional


From Billboard:

“If I were to try and list the albums that changed my life I would be talking to you forever,” he laughs, remembering which ones they'd obsess over. The Cure were and remain an immense source of inspiration for him. “It's hard to pick one record by that band,” he says. “But I would say that Robert Smith's influence on me is pretty clear to anyone who has heard me sing my songs.” Elsewhere he cites 24 Hour Revenge Therapy by Jawbreaker, and everything by R.E.M., Radiohead and The Beatles. “But while Jonny Greenwood is my single favorite guitar player,” he says of the former, “it is Fugazi that I regard as the most innovative band of all time.”

Darren Aronfosky is a Cure fan


From NME:

We’ve heard you love The Cure. What’s your favourite song?

“I like ‘A Forest’. It’s a great fucking song. They’re a great band. I remember when everyone else was listening to disco and I was getting into The Cure. I guess I resist popular culture just a pinch and look for the edges.”

40 Years of The Cure: one of Britain’s most underrated bands


It’s been an unbelievable 40 years since iconic musician and singer Robert Smith took on the role of frontman for his school band The Easy Cure.

This group of friends had been gigging locally but struggled to find the right singer until Smith stepped up in September 1977 and he hasn’t stepped down since.

In fact this much-loved group (renamed the more familiar The Cure in ’78) have consistently released new material and continued to perform live for the past four decades.

However, despite inspiring a Gothic generation and enjoying a few commercial bursts (including the ubiquitous The Love Cats and Friday I’m In Love) this prolific group have slipped a little under the popular radar.

Which is probably where they like it.

But for the global army of fans who have kept faith all these years, a Cure gig is still the best night out of the year.

Think three euphoric dancing hours of familiar hits, forgotten favourites and all the feels.
We pore over the extensive back catalogue, stuffed full of gems applicable to any situation or emotion.

Whether you want to laugh, cry, fall in love or dance wildly, there’s a track for that.

Read the rest at Metro.

James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem loves 'Pornography', The Cure, and Lol's drumming


From Noisey:

I've heard you care a lot about the drumming of Lol Tolhurst of The Cure.
 
One of my all time favourite albums is Pornography by The Cure. What a terrifying album, and I'm a massive nerd about his drumming [goes into long but precise description of The Cure's early drum sound is achieved]. When he left the group I was broken-hearted. During a specific era of my life, The Cure and The Smiths held two very different but very important polar feelings for me.

You're clearly an Anglophile. How far back can you trace this?
 
Between the age of 13 and 16 I liked The Clash, Bowie, Echo And The Bunnymen, The Cure, The Smiths, Sisters Of Mercy, Joy Division and New Order. Between 1983 and 1986 most of these bands were big in Britain but were still very, very underground in the US so would play smaller venues. And that overlapped really densely with some of the most important years of my life. Then when I was 16 I had a school trip to England. I fully expected to get off the plane and step into punk rock heaven, where everyone was going to be wearing long trench coats and have crazy hair. I didn't know anything about lad culture or how intensely conservative Britain was at that time. When I got here I was like… "WHOA… OK, now I get it. The Smiths and The Cure were born from how they looked totally not being OK in mainstream British culture." It was a great trip—very important—but it was also a real wake up call.

Ben Folds on his cover of 'In Between Days'


From App:

Folds has no problem slipping in covers. His cover of The Cure's "In Between Days" is a fan favorite. Robert Smith, who wrote the song, enjoys Folds version.

"It's a great song," Folds said. "I've always liked that song and that album ('Head on the Door'). Robert Smith really liked my version a lot. The interesting thing is that he was being urged to let recording artists cover songs for a Cure tribute album and from what I hear he wasn't crazy about the idea. I'm told my version of 'In Between Days' changed his mind about that. His approval of my version of his song is the highlight of my career."

The Story of Goth in 33 Songs


From Pitchfork:

1980
The Cure
“A Forest”

Goth is synonymous with excess—too much echo, too much feeling, too much eyeliner. But “A Forest,” off 1980’s spellbinding Seventeen Seconds, is a masterpiece of minimalism. It is a world away from so many of the band’s other signature efforts: the spiky, sprightly post-punk of Boys Don’t Cry, the druggy dolor of Pornography, the rococo swirl of Disintegration. Composed around a four-note synth part, with bass and guitar counterpoints twirling like vines, it follows a steady motorik groove that’s evocative of train travel; the reverb on the snare feels like it’s going backward and forward at the same time, which only adds to the sense that it could go on forever (a goal they would inch closer to, a year later, with the nearly 30-minute “Carnage Visors”). Deliciously repetitive, “A Forest” stretches from horizon to horizon, bleak as winter branches against a dull grey sky. –Philip Sherburne

52 Albums That Changed My Life, Chapter 44: Bloodflowers


I’m sure that certain albums appearing on this list make little to no sense to other music fans or critics but part of the idea is to reiterate the fact that music is very much a personal thing. The songs and albums that influence us may come at different times or decades of our lives than others. Hence why out of all the amazing albums The Cure have put out over the years, it’s Bloodflowers that makes my list.

Don’t get me wrong, Bloodflowers is a great album but it definitely isn’t Disintegration. The main reason I have Bloodflowers on this list is it’s the album that finally convinced me that buying an album by The Cure was worth the money.

My first encounter with the music of The Cure was when “Friday I’m in Love” hit the airways and became The Cure’s biggest known hit. At the time, the song just sounded like so much crap to me. It was light and breezy and what was the deal with dude’s make up? No thank you, I’ll go back to Ministry and Skinny Puppy.

Read the rest at A Journal of Musical Things.